Updates inside: Valentine Cards are in!
Grumpy's February Letters are in!
Cogratulations to Grumpy's February Bath Salts winner,
Pablo Picante








And as I move through
an obscure and poppied world
behold a shrouded form
that seems to question me!

-Thomas Gotch








Dupres and Reno were able to find a small cottage
with several mature trees where they could both live,
out of each other's way.
The rebel squirrel was able to register as a
self employed artist the following day, allowing him
to retain his citizen bracelet. He had always wanted
to paint but never had the time in his old world.
Now he had the chance and unlike artists in the
other world, finances were not an issue.

Once they were settled, Dupres explained to Reno
that she was free. Speaking telepathically as all
squirrels in this world did, he told her that he would not,
and could not own her for he would be returning
to his own world one day.
"But I can't just live here without you." She said.
"It's illegal for a human to live alone, without a squirrel
to take responsibility for it."
"Look," he went on. "I just wanted to get you out of there.
I can't commit to a pet."
Reno became angry. "Don't you know what will happen to me
without your protection?" She walked to the end of their property
and pointed to a small group of humans digging through the trash.
"Do you want me to end up like that?" Before Dupres could answer, she turned to him,
"Do you know what those animals would do to a woman … on her own?"

"I can't stay here forever." He said softly.

"Then you should have let me die in the shelter."
And with that, her gaze went back to the scene at the dumpster.
Then, she asked him a very odd question.

"So, in your world, are you the President?"
"Whatever do you mean?" He asked.
"Our president's name," She went on, "is Stockton Dupres."

Dupres dropped his pallette and brushes as he gasped at the implication.
"Did I say something wrong?" Reno asked as she came over to help pick up his things.
"I've got to speak to the president." He exclaimed. "Can you help me?
Reno slowly stood up, clutching the brushes. "You can't do that." She said.
"But it's very important," said Dupres. "He will want to see me."
"But…" She looked puzzled. "Don't you know he's dead?"
""Yes," he said, "But so am I."
"He's really dead." She said.
"If he's really dead," Dupres queried, "How can he be president?"
Reno went on to explain. "Our new society is built on the ideals
that were set by him. They are so much a part of our foundation and
belief system that we do not need a living president to guide us."

"But I don't understand." Said the confused squirrel.
"I've been alive for nearly 300 years.
I can't die. . . How did it happen to him?"

Janet Reno was beginning to put things together. She sat down
in the grass beside him. "He was executed on death row in 1999."
Dupres remembered back to 1999 when he was on death row.
But he had escaped before the execution.
"He couldn't have died that way." Dupres insisted.

"Apparently, he was able to give his life for something he believed in.
" She said. "Maybe that was the only way he could die.
Once the execution had taken place, squirrels all over the world
rose up to fight for control of the Earth. Animals everywhere,
wild and domestic, joined them. In less than a month,
the humans were subdued. Those that would not submit to
the new societal laws were exterminated."

"Astonishing," he said. "But I find it hard to believe that President Dupres
ever would have agreed to the continued euthanasia of innocent humans,
such as we have in the shelters now."
"You are quite right." She explained. "President Dupres wrote that the humans
who surrendered should be cared for by society until their natural lives had ended.
He believed that law-enforced population control was the solution.
But once he was dead, the living squirrels felt that forcing them to pay for
the care and spay/neutering of all the humans was infringing upon their liberty.
So they decided that euthanasia of all homeless humans was the answer.

Dupres hung his head as a great feeling of shame and remorse came over him.
He was supposed to die on death row. That is how he would have saved the world.
But the new world he gave to the squirrels would only create another form of cruelty.
He was inconsolable.

Reno had set up his brushes and made the easel ready.
"Come on, Stockton," she pleaded. " Paint something nice
and forget about those old problems."

He looked up through blurry eyes and saw the new world
in a distorted haze. How could he paint beauty, when all there
was to see, was the ugliness of speciesm…even from his own kind?


To be continued . . .



If this makes no sense to you
And you want it to,
There is a link to Stockton Dupres
inside where you can catch up.




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The opinions expressed by Stockton Dupres do not
necessarily reflect the views of this website or its creator.

All squirrel animation and photo alterations by b.kee(c)1999
Original squirrel photo (c)Gregg Elovich

Most Music on this site from unknown sources

©1997greysquirrel@greysquirrel.net




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